Coupling and Cohesion

This week I wanted to learn more about coupling. The article I found happened to be about both coupling and cohesion.

Coupling and cohesion are both terms that refer to the modularity in a system. They help measure how complex the design of an object-oriented system is. Good knowledge of both is needed to build scalable systems that can be extended and maintained over time.

Coupling is how interdependent software modules are. With high coupling, software modules are very independent, and they need each other to run. There are several types of coupling:

  • Content coupling — this is a type of coupling in which a module can access or modify the content of any other module. When a component passes parameters to control the activity of some other component, there is a control coupling amongst the two components.
  • Common coupling — this is a type of coupling in which you have multiple modules having access to a shared global data
  • Stamp coupling — this is a type of coupling in which data structure is used to pass information from one component in the system to another
  • Control coupling — this is a type of coupling in which one module can change the flow of execution of another module
  • Data coupling — in this type of coupling, two modules interact by exchanging or passing data as a parameter

Cohesion is how intra-dependent a software module is. High cohesion is a software module that forms its own meaningful unit. There are also different types of cohesion:

  • Co-incidental cohesion — this is an unplanned random cohesion that might be a result of breaking a module into smaller modules.
  • Logical cohesion — this is a type of cohesion in which multiple logically related functions or data elements are placed in the same component
  • Temporal cohesion — this is a type of cohesion in which elements of a module are grouped in a manner in which they are processed at the same point of time. An example could be a component that is used to initialize a set of objects.
  • Procedural cohesion — this is a type of cohesion in which the functions in a component are grouped in a way to enable them to be executed sequentially and make them procedurally cohesive
  • Communicational cohesion — in this type of cohesion the elements of a module are logically grouped together in a way that they execute sequentially and they work on the same data
  • Sequential cohesion — in this type of cohesion the elements of a module are grouped in such a manner that the output of one of them becomes the input of the next — they all execute sequentially. In essence, if the output of one part of a component is the input of another, we say that the component has sequential cohesion.
  • Functional cohesion — this is the best and the most preferred type of cohesion in which the degree of cohesion is the highest. In this type of cohesion, the elements of a module are functionally grouped into a logical unit and they work together as a logical unit — this also promotes flexibility and reusability.

Tight coupling makes maintenance difficult as all the components depend on each other.

This article was helpful in explaining these two concepts. As we develop increasingly complicated software in our courses and careers it is important to learn more abstract concepts. These were things I have never really thought about before. Usually I write code just so that it works. If I am going a step further I might try to make it “look good” and be neatly indented with as few lines as possible. Especially going into the capstone course, I will have to evaluate my code for things like low coupling and high cohesion.

https://www.infoworld.com/article/2949579/design-for-change-coupling-and-cohesion-in-object-oriented-systems.html

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